Tagged "wonder woman" | Superdames!
Posts tagged "wonder woman"

Oh look, they found a use for men.

—Wonder Woman #26 (1947) by William Moulton Marston & H.G. Peter

Yeah, women are worthy.

  • Jane Foster in What If? #10 (1978)
  • Storm in X-Men Annual #9 (1985)
  • Rogue in What If? #66 (1994)
  • Wonder Woman in DC Versus Marvel #3 (1996)
  • Black Widow in What If: Age of Ultron #3 (2014)

Stickin’ it to City Hall.

jthenr-comics-vault:

SENSATION COMICS #34 (Oct. 1944)
Art by H.G. Peter

(via hikeeba-hikeeba-hikeeba)

superdames:

Wonder Woman was created by a feminist.

Wonder Woman was a champion of feminists.

Wonder Woman is a feminist.

If you don’t want to call her one, you probably shouldn’t be doing a book called Wonder Woman.

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Haters reblogging this post.

People cracking jokes about how William Moulton Marston was a bohemian polygamist psychologist with a bondage fetish … as if this somehow disqualifies him from also being a feminist who believed in equality of the sexes?

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People claiming modern feminism is somehow vile, or a bad word, or some awful thing, as if it’s a monolithic movement or any one practice of feminism somehow monopolizes all feminists?

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People claiming Wonder Woman’s not a feminist, as if she’s not literally an ambassador sent to a place she calls “Man’s World” to try to convince people that women can be just as powerful as men — and to save them from destroying themselves in war?

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Feminism takes literally hundreds of differing and even conflicting forms when put into practice — as varied as people themselves, imagine that. But the belief in the equality of the sexes is literally the ONLY thing they have ever had — and have ALWAYS had — and they ALL have in common.

Just because you have a warped view of what feminism is, or you don’t like some version of feminism you encountered, doesn’t mean the rest of us have to accommodate your misconceptions.

I got no time for you haters. I’m here to celebrate women.

Deal with it.

The idea of Wonder Woman as a feminist icon is so imprinted in her history, and in analysis of the character, that separating her from feminism should be near impossible.

mental-radio1:

Up where she belongs.  Wonder Woman takes her place as one of the founding mothers.  Happy 4th of July, y’all.

Wonder Woman #300, February 1983. Art by Keith Pollard. 

dcwomenkickingass:

Yesterday DC Comics announced that David Finch and his wife Meredith would be the new creative team on Wonder Woman. While I’ve already expressed concerns about Mr. Finch’s art and the short writing resume of Ms. Finch, there is now another, much bigger concern. 

In an interview today with CBR Finch stated:

Really, from where I come from, and we’ve talked about this a lot, we want to make sure it’s a book that treats her as a human being first and foremost, but is also respectful of the fact that she represents something more. We want her to be a strong — I don’t want to say feminist, but a strong character. Beautiful, but strong.

I can’t imagine another character about which you wouldn’t want to say she’s a feminist. The character’s creation, her history, her every single quality is derived from feminism. To not want to say “feminist” about her is like saying you don’t want to say “alien” about Superman or “orphan” about Batman. It is part of the character’s DNA.

As you can imagine that quote didn’t go over well. So a few hours later Mr. Finch tried qualify it.

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Say what? 

Feminists ARE human. Feminists ARE Fallible. Feminists ARE Real.

I’m sure this is just a misunderstanding. I would be shocked if the person heading the creative team of Wonder Woman would not understand this.

Because any person who cannot acknowledge and state clearly that Wonder Woman is a feminist and understands what feminism is has no business being near the character.

Mr. Finch is not doing himself any favors, I see.

(via heroinebadass)

Cool story bro.

Feminism was never one thing.

Feminism is still necessary.

Feminism is always necessary.

Wonder Woman is a feminist.

Wonder Woman was created by a feminist.

Wonder Woman was a champion of feminists.

Wonder Woman is a feminist.

If you don’t want to call her one, you probably shouldn’t be doing a book called Wonder Woman.

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mental-radio1:

heckyeahstevetrevor:

Wonder Woman would be SO GOOD at fasting for Ramadan.
——Wonder Woman #49 (1951) written by Robert Kanigher; art by HG Peter

Beware.  Big breakfasts have lesbian overtones. 
"As to the ‘advanced femininity,’ what are the activities in comic books which women ‘indulge in on an equal footing with men’? They do not work. They are not homemakers. They do not bring up a family. Mother-love is entirely absent. Even when Wonder Woman adopts a girl there are Lesbian overtones."—Frederic Wertham, Seduction of the Innocent.  

Well, good morning, Tumblr.

mental-radio1:

heckyeahstevetrevor:

Wonder Woman would be SO GOOD at fasting for Ramadan.

——
Wonder Woman #49 (1951) written by Robert Kanigher; art by HG Peter

Beware.  Big breakfasts have lesbian overtones. 

"As to the ‘advanced femininity,’ what are the activities in comic books which women ‘indulge in on an equal footing with men’? They do not work. They are not homemakers. They do not bring up a family. Mother-love is entirely absent. Even when Wonder Woman adopts a girl there are Lesbian overtones."

—Frederic Wertham, Seduction of the Innocent.  

Well, good morning, Tumblr.

Poor girl…
—Wonder Woman #17 (1946) by Joyce Murchison & H.G. Peter

Poor girl…

—Wonder Woman #17 (1946) by Joyce Murchison & H.G. Peter

Oh nothing, just Wonder Woman leading a flight of rare birds over the astral plane.

—Sensation Comics #25 (1944) by William Moulton Marston & H.G. Peter

In the Golden Age, Wonder Woman’s lasso did not just compel you to tell the truth, it compelled you to obey commands.

ravingsofanundiscoveredgenius:

superdames:

Illustration by H.G. Peter for the article “Why 100,000,000 Americans Read Comics” by William Moulton Marston in the winter 1943 issue of The American Scholar.

She needs to pull that trick on a Hollywood executive sometime

(via superdames)

Top: Wonder Woman #32 (1948) by H.G. Peter

Bottom: “Reflections on Minerva” (1990) by Roy Lichtenstein

Great moments in dashboard synergy.