Tagged "wonder woman" | Superdames!

Superdames!

Women in comics throughout history.
Recent Tweets @superdames
Posts I Like
Whom I Follow
Posts tagged "wonder woman"
"It Ain’t Me Babe" underground women’s liberation comix anthology (1970) cover by Trina Robbins

"It Ain’t Me Babe" underground women’s liberation comix anthology (1970) cover by Trina Robbins

goldenagecomicsvault:

WONDER WOMAN #16 (March 1946)
Art by H.G. Peter 

scarlettshazam:

Panel from Wonder Woman #279, May 1981

Diana asking the real questions

—Legends #6 (1987) script by John Ostrander & Len Wein, art by John Byrne & Karl Kesel

Freedom & victory.

—Legends #6 (1987) script by John Ostrander & Len Wein, art by John Byrne & Karl Kesel

Wonder Woman is (re-)introduced to the rebooted 1980s DC Universe.

After DC Comics rebooted in the 1980s, it published the miniseries Legends to (re-)introduce a lot of its lesser-known (non-Superman, non-Batman) characters. Wonder Woman’s rebooted solo book by George Pérez was just a few months old by the time she appeared in Legends, but here was her first appearance in the wider DC Universe — and apparently one of her first times outside of Themyscira. Guy Gardner (the first to encounter her in Legends) and the public at large don’t even know who she is. She just bursts on the scene and tells everyone to get their act together.

I loved it.

It was treated very much like an introduction to a new character, or at least a new readership for an old character — and it totally worked on me. I had just started reading comics around this time, and I came to DC from the Christopher Reeve Superman movies. I knew who Wonder Woman was, of course — I’d seen Super Friends and read some Justice League back-issues — but this Wonder Woman was powerful, confident, independent, and mysterious. Not to mention John Byrne, one of the biggest superstar artists of the era, was at the top of his game.

At the end of Legends, when the rest of the heroes are patting themselves on the back and doing that whole “Maybe we should form a team” thing, Wonder Woman quietly sneaks away unnoticed.

"Dang," I thought, "Wonder Woman is on a whole other level."

—Image from Legends #6 (1987), script by John Ostrander & Len Wein, art by John Byrne & Karl Kesel

superdames:

Illustration by H.G. Peter for the article “Why 100,000,000 Americans Read Comics” by William Moulton Marston in the winter 1943 issue of The American Scholar.

Basically how I imagine the Justice League movie.

—Justice League of America #16 (1962) words by Gardner Fox, art by Mike Sekowsky & Bernard Sachs

Wonder Woman judges your hypothesis.

comicslams:

Wonder Woman Vol. 36 No. 228, February 1977

I don’t care who they are, I want to join that triumphant gang.

tompeyer:

Controlling the balloons through their specially-built cars

(via onepanelusubmit)

One swing of Wonder Woman’s mighty fist.

—Wonder Woman #28 (1948) by William Moulton Marston & H.G. Peter

tompeyer:

Being romance editor is but one of her myriad activities.  

(via onepanelusubmit)


Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman, 1970s

Happy Birthday, Lynda Carter!

Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman, 1970s

Happy Birthday, Lynda Carter!

(via vintagegal)

Oh look, they found a use for men.

—Wonder Woman #26 (1947) by William Moulton Marston & H.G. Peter

Yeah, women are worthy.

  • Jane Foster in What If? #10 (1978)
  • Storm in X-Men Annual #9 (1985)
  • Rogue in What If? #66 (1994)
  • Wonder Woman in DC Versus Marvel #3 (1996)
  • Black Widow in What If: Age of Ultron #3 (2014)